Farm Science Review: 'Breaking new ground' ... while flying above it

From teaching techniques to help growers improve water and soil quality to helping farmers and producers learn how to combat invasive species, experts from CFAES will seek to "break new ground" during this year's Farm Science Review Sept. 17-19 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London.

Following a theme of "Breaking New Ground," the event will emphasize the best agricultural research, resources, information, and access for farmers, said Chuck Gamble, who manages the Review.

"How do we protect the soil, how do we improve water quality are just some of the issues farmers are facing now because so much of what is going on today in agriculture is oriented around water quality," he said.

 

 

 

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"Invasive species are also a huge issue for Ohio. I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that people don't understand or know what it is when we talk about invasive species."

Invasive species, which can include trees, beetles, shrubs, mussels, fish, fungi, weeds, or feral pigs, are species that aren't native to a place but arrive through people's actions, either by accident or on purpose. They usually spread fast and can reduce or eliminate native species.

Ohio's premier agricultural event

These issues are just a sampling of some of the topics participants can expect to learn about during the three-day farm trade show that annually draws more than 130,000 farmers, growers, producers, and agricultural enthusiasts from across the U.S. and Canada.

"We've got our best crop start ever here at the Review. Our corn and soybean prospects are the best crops we've ever planted, and we're harvesting the best wheat crop we've ever grown."—Chuck Gamble

Now in its 51st year, the Review is nationally known as Ohio's premier agricultural event, Gamble said. And with growers experiencing more of a typical growing season in 2013, he said he anticipates attendance to be strong this year.

"We've got our best crop start ever here at the Review," Gamble said. "Our corn and soybean prospects are the best crops we've ever planted, and we're harvesting the best wheat crop we've ever grown."

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-- Tracy Turner, Communications and Technology